Wednesday, February 23, 2005

This Canucklehead says NO THANKS!

Group Looks At North America To Become One Country

(excerpt)

OTTAWA—An influential tri-national panel has considered a raft of bold proposals for an integrated North America, including a continental customs union, single passport and contiguous security perimeter.

According to a confidential internal summary from the first of three meetings of the Task Force on the Future of North America, discussions also broached the possibility of lifting trade exemptions on cultural goods and Canadian water exports. ...

Members said the task force's final report this spring will focus on "achievable" rather than simply academic questions like that of a single North American currency.

Nevertheless, the initial debates prompted a sharp reaction from trade skeptics and nationalist groups like the Council of Canadians, who fear business leaders and the politically connected are concocting plans to cede important areas of sovereignty at the behest of American business interests. ...

"What they envisage is a new North American reality with one passport, one immigration and refugee policy, one security regime, one foreign policy, one common set of environmental, health and safety standards ... a brand name that will be sold to school kids, all based on the interests and the needs of the U.S.," she said. ...


Comment: Unfortunately, all of this is probably inevitable. Oh yeah, and here is the official website of the Council of Canadians.

2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

There's really no need for trying to force an artificial unity. Your socialist country will eventually implode, and then we Americans will be there to pick up the pieces. :)

One thing I think is funny is that I always hear Canadians calling Americans arrogant for saying that our country is the greatest on earth. But then, I hear the same types of claims about Canada on Canadian radio commercials that I hear on the internet coming out of Toronto!

Justin Kissel

10:56 p.m.  
Blogger The Rambler said...

Justin

There's really no need for trying to force an artificial unity. Your socialist country will eventually implode, and then we Americans will be there to pick up the pieces. :)Given the way that reptile you've got in the 'Oval Office' is carrying on, I think it will be a wonder if there will be anyone left on this continent who will be able to "pick up the pieces." For better or worse, our destiny as a nation is wrapped up in the decisions made in Washington, so if (when?) the U.S. dollar falls through the floor and becomes the new Peso, we here will suffer at least as much as anyone stateside.

Btw. I'm hardly uncritical of the way things are going here. America and Canada seem to both be plagued by a mixture of apathy and ignorance - the only difference here being that the "apathy" is the weightier part of the equation, which far from being an insult to the Americans (characterizing them as "ignorant"), I find more damnable; most people here seem to not be so much "unaware" or pleased with how our own leaders ignore us and treat us with contempt...they just can't muster the energy to give a damn.

Which in part, is why I think as well intentioned as groups like the Council of Canadians may be, their efforts ultimatly will be in vain. This is not due to any cowardice on the part of Canadians...but like I said, the result of endemic apathy. Most of us (even blue collar folks like myself) are too comfortable to realized we are the frog slowly being boiled to death.

One big difference I do notice though (and I would count it as a "good point" for us canuckleheads), is that in this country, criticism of leaders (even unto the point of wanton mockery) is not viewed as a profoundly subversive activity; nor would anyone question someone's loyalties or affection for this country for stating quite clearly they loath the leadership. Yet I've noticed in the U.S., many who criticize the highest houses of power (particularly if it is truly biting criticism, and not simply the obscenely biased self interest of political partisanship) are viewed as being "enemies" or somehow even "unpatriotic". Of course this is a generalization, but it's a tendency I've observed given my personal ties to your country (having both blood family who live in America, and a wife who was born and raised in the United States, and the American in-laws which come as part of the package.)

One thing I think is funny is that I always hear Canadians calling Americans arrogant for saying that our country is the greatest on earth.Well, I personally don't make those criticisms, but I know many (and not just Canadians) do. I have no problem with you guys loving the "Stars and Stripes" and being convinced you live in the best place on earth (and compared to most, it is pretty damned good... though having lived down there for a spell, and having regular contact with Americans, I do prefer living here and consider myself blessed.)

I think what many people instinctively have a problem with, on a gut level, is the perception that it's not good enough for you guys to simply be allowed to believe "USA #1" - but that somehow we're expected to agree!

I've noticed (and you seem unfortunately confirming this - correct me if I'm terribly mistaken) that a lot of Americans who bother to familiarize themselves with the issue of "Canadian sovereignty" seem to take some kind of offence to we Canadians (or anyone for that matter) having little or no interest being a franchise of Uncle Sam.

9:31 a.m.  

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